JAIL REFORM & SHORTER JAIL TIME WITH COURT PROCESSES LIKE IMMUNITY CLEMECY FORMS OF PARDONS

BY OUT THE GATE BY SHAFT "NO FUJ"

Clemency is the act of reducing a penalty for a particular criminal offense without clearing the person's criminal history. A pardon is when a government official 'forgives' a particular criminal offense, either because the individual was wrongfully convicted of the crime or the punishment was inappropriate.

The seven requirements to be eligible for this pardon are: At least 10 years have passed since you were either convicted of the crime, or released from a period of incarceration for that crime, if applicable. You have been conviction-free since that time. You have been convicted of a non-violent offense

Applying for Federal Clemency

To apply for a presidential pardon, one must first wait five years from the time your sentence is completed. You must then contact the federal government for a pardon application. With this application, you will need to draft a letter explaining why you think you are entitled to clemency.

​The government says that $631 is what it costs to process a pardon application.

Apply for pardon or clemency

Shorter Jail time Clemency pardon , immunity ,

CLEMENCY FORMS & INSTRUCTIONS

Commutation Application | Pardon Application | Vietnam-Era Pardon Application

Policies: Posthumous Pardon Applications | Pardons for Misdemeanor Federal Convictions | Pardon Applications Submitted by Non-residents of the United States

To ensure the integrity and security of our electronic records, the Office of the Pardon Attorney will not accept encrypted digital media as part of or in supplement to an application for clemency. Such items will be destroyed upon receipt.

PETITION FOR COMMUTATION OF SENTENCE (SENTENCE REDUCTION)

Federal Convictions Only

Under the Constitution, the President has the authority to commute, or reduce, a sentence imposed upon conviction of a federal offense, including for convictions adjudicated in the United States District Courts and the Superior Court of the District of Columbia.

The President cannot commute a sentence for a state criminal offense. Accordingly, if you are seeking clemency for a state criminal conviction, you should not complete and submit this petition. Instead, you should contact the Governor or other appropriate authorities of the state where the conviction occurred (e.g., the state board of pardons and paroles) to determine whether any relief is available to you under state law.

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PETITION FOR PARDON AFTER COMPLETION OF SENTENCE

Federal Convictions Only

Under the Constitution, the President has the authority to grant pardon for federal offenses, including those adjudicated in the United States District Courts, the Superior Court of the District of Columbia, and military courts-martial.

The President cannot pardon a state criminal offense. Accordingly, if you are seeking clemency for a state criminal conviction, you should not complete and submit this petition. Instead, you should contact the Governor or other appropriate authorities of the state where the conviction occurred (e.g., the state board of pardons and paroles) to determine whether any relief is available to you under state law.

Five Year Waiting Period

Under the Department's rules governing petitions for executive clemency, an applicant must satisfy a minimum waiting period of five years before he becomes eligible to apply for a presidential pardon of his federal conviction. The waiting period begins to run on the date of the petitioner's release from confinement. Alternatively, if the conviction resulted in a sentence that did not include any form of confinement, the waiting period begins on the date of sentencing.

A waiver of any portion of the waiting period is rarely granted and then only in the most exceptional circumstances. In order to request a waiver, you must complete the pardon application form and submit it with a letter explaining why you believe the waiting period should be waived in your case.

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APPLICATION FOR CERTIFICATE OF PARDON FOR VIETNAM WAR ERA SELECTIVE SERVICE ACT VIOLATIONS (AUGUST 4, 1964 TO MARCH 28, 1973)

President Carter, by Proclamation of January 21, 1977, pardoned certain persons who, during the Vietnam War era, violated the Military Selective Service Act by draft-evasion acts or omissions committed between August 4, 1964 and March 28, 1973. If you believe your conviction is covered by President Carter’s Proclamation and you can provide the required documentation from your criminal case that will enable us to verify that you are covered by the Proclamation, you may obtain an individual certificate of pardon evidencing the fact that this Pardon Proclamation applies to you.

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RIGHTS OF PERSONS CONFINED TO JAILS AND PRISONS

Overview

The Special Litigation Section works to protect the rights of people who are in prisons and jails run by state or local governments. If we find that a state or local government systematically deprives people in these facilities of their rights, we can act.

We use information from community members affected by civil rights violations to bring and pursue cases. The voice of the community is very important to us. We receive hundreds of reports of potential violations each week. We collect this information and it informs our case selection. We may sometimes use it as evidence in an existing case. However, we cannot bring a case based on every report we receive.

Description of the Laws We Use in Our Corrections Work

The Civil Rights of Institutionalized Persons Act (CRIPA), 42 U.S.C. § 1997a, allows the Attorney General to review conditions and practices within these institutions. Under CRIPA, we are not authorized to address issues with federal facilities or federal officials. We do not assist with individual problems, and we therefore cannot help you recover money damages or any other personal relief. We also cannot assist in criminal cases, including wrongful convictions, appeals or sentencing.

After a CRIPA investigation, we can act if we identify a systemic pattern or practice that causes harm. Evidence of harm to one individual only - even if that harm is serious - is not enough. If we find systemic problems, we may send the state or local government a letter that describes the problems and what says what steps they must take to fix them. We will try to reach an agreement with the state or local government on how to fix the problems. If we cannot agree, then the Attorney General may file a lawsuit in federal court.

In addition to actions under CRIPA, the Section may use the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, 42 U.S.C. § 14141, to protect the rights of persons in the juvenile justice system.

Results of Our Corrections Work

Tens of thousands of institutionalized persons who were confined in dire, often life-threatening, conditions now receive adequate care and services because of this work. We currently have open CRIPA matters in more than half the states.

Our work includes many different kinds of activity. We speak with community stakeholders. We review and investigate complaints. We file lawsuits in federal court when necessary, and enforce orders we obtain from the courts. We participate in cases brought by private parties. We work closely with nationally renowned experts to provide training and technical assistance.

We work closely with other parts of the Justice Department and other federal agencies that regulate, fund, and provide technical assistance to state and local governments. We work with the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, the National Institute of Justice, the Bureau of Prisons, the United States Department of Education, the Department of Housing, and the United States Department of Health and Human Services. In addition, our staff serves on the Department's Health Care Fraud Working Group, the Prison Rape Elimination Working Group, and other task forces.

Witness immunity from prosecution occurs when a prosecutor grants immunity to a witness in exchange for testimony or production of other evidence. In the United States, the prosecution may grant immunity in one of two forms.

Qualified immunity is a legal doctrine in United States federal law that shields government officials from being sued for discretionary actions performed within their official capacity, unless their actions violated "clearly established" federal law or constitutional rights.

​A witness who refuses to testify after being given immunity can be held in contempt of court and subjected to fines and jail time. ... That said, once the prosecution has granted immunity, it's limited in how it can use that testimony in the future

Legal immunity. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Legal immunity, or immunity from prosecution, is a legal status wherein an individual or entity cannot be held liable for a violation of the law, in order to facilitate societal aims that outweigh the value of imposing liability in such cases.


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